IN THIS WEEK’S ISSUE

8 pirates involved in Bangladeshi ship hijacking are arrested

Taslima Jamal

A high-ranking police officer of Puntland told the media that these 8 bandits involved in the hostage taking of Bangladeshi ships and sailors have been arrested.

8 pirates involved in the hijacking of the Bangladeshi ship MV Abdullah have been arrested. The pirates left the ship with 23 sailors on Saturday (April 13) after receiving the ransom.

Somali media outlet Garroe Online reported that the bandits were arrested off the east coast of the autonomous region of Puntland shortly after the ship was released.

A high-ranking police officer of Puntland told the media that these 8 bandits involved in the hostage taking of Bangladeshi ships and sailors have been arrested. However, he did not clarify whether it was possible to recover any ransom money from them.

Meanwhile, the two bandits told the British news agency Reuters that they were paid 5 million dollars as ransom two days ago. Later they check whether these moneys are fake or not. They then divided the money among themselves and left the ship.

A police officer in Puntland has expressed concern that the release of ships for ransom may encourage pirates to hijack more ships.

Somali pirate activity has increased in the Indian Ocean over the past three months. These bandits are working together with the armed group al-Shabaab, the government of Somalia said. Pirates are being arrested and prosecuted to stop piracy.

On April 17, the Indian Navy rescued a ship named MV Rouen from Somali pirates. They conducted a commando operation to rescue the ship.

The Indian Navy offered to launch a military operation to free the Bangladeshi ship as well. But the Bangladesh government did not agree to it, thinking about the safety of the sailors.

Instead, a negotiated path was followed to bring back the sailors. By doing this it was possible to rescue all the sailors unharmed.

On March 12, the Bangladeshi ship MV Abdullah was captured by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean while carrying coal from Mozambique to the United Arab Emirates. It is owned by Kabir Re Rolling Mills. At that time there were 23 sailors on the ship.

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